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CARING FOR INFANTS, CHILDREN & TEENS

Is Their Eczema Something More?

Infants, children, and teens who have eczema that keeps coming back may be living with a chronic condition called atopic dermatitis. This is often the result of a highly overactive immune system. Understanding this can help how you approach managing this condition for your child.

Talking Is a Good Start

How we view and discuss eczema affects how we manage it. To prepare for those conversations at every age, select a tab below.

Infants –
5 Years of Age
Children Ages
6-12 Yrs
Teens Ages
13-17 Yrs

Their charm comes
from within. And so might
their eczema.

Knowledge Leads to Discussion

You worry about their lack of sleep, fussiness, and missed playdates.

As a person caring for an infant, toddler, or preschooler, it can be frustrating when you continue to do everything you can to help, but their eczema keeps coming back. You hope someday they’ll outgrow their eczema, but the fact is, some don’t.

Because your child can’t fully communicate yet, you do your best to monitor and assess their condition. The descriptions and observations you provide to their doctor are critical to your child receiving the proper care.

The topics of skin appearance, onset, frequency, itching, sleep quality, and treatment methods are important to keep in mind when talking to your child’s doctor. Select a topic below to learn more.

Skin Appearance

Skin Appearance

Be able to describe any rashes in terms of color and texture. It can be helpful to take pictures in between appointments to have a record to show the doctor.

Onset

Onset

Remember to bring up when your child first started to experience eczema symptoms.

Frequency

Frequency

Make sure to explain if your child has constant, frequent, or occasional flare-ups.

Sleep Quality

Sleep Quality

While nearly all infants are inconsistent when it comes to sleep, it is important to mention if you notice a connection between their symptoms and their inability to rest comfortably.

Itch

Itch

Tell the doctor if you notice your child constantly itching. The urge to itch is often caused in part by inflammation under the skin. Understand more about the causes of eczema.

Treatment Methods

Treatment Methods

Describe any prescription or non-prescription product, including topical creams, that you are using or have used in the past for your child’s condition.

For more insight, download our doctor discussion guide below.

Get Talking: A Parent’s Guide

A doctor discussion guide provides specific questions to consider about your infant, toddler or preschooler’s eczema, as well as an organized location to take notes.

This personalized resource can help you prepare for a productive discussion with your child’s doctor.

Before

Prepare a list of symptoms you observe as being most bothersome to them.

Describe to the doctor the impact your child’s symptoms have on their daily activities.

During

When in doubt, ask your questions. Always speak up.

Get a next-step plan from your child's doctor.

After

Implement the plan you and your child's doctor created.

Monitor your child’s progress and check in with their doctor.

Understand the Basics

When you have a child 5 years or under with eczema, you are often at the beginning of their journey with this disease. So you may not know that those recurring flare-ups on the surface of your child’s skin could be the outward signs of deeper inflammation caused in part by a overactive immune system.

Understanding that inflammation means you and your child’s doctor can better consider the current eczema treatments available, including:

  • Prescription topicals
  • Phototherapy
  • Oral pills
  • Biologics

There’s more to learn. Click below and get an even better understanding of eczema.

His character comes
from within. And so might
his eczema.

Talking About Eczema With Your Child

Kids question so much in life. How many times have you been asked why the sky is blue, the grass is green, or why your child can’t do everything they want? When you throw eczema in the mix, the answers can be even more challenging.

So, even if you can’t answer all of the questions they are asking, here are some quick tips and ways to help them understand their condition:

Their eczema may never go away, but it can be managed if you understand what the causes are.

Unfortunately, you may have to live with eczema your whole life. But, doctors are understanding more about what causes it every day. This will help us understand your eczema better.

Let them know that you are always there to listen to them, and help answer any questions—even if you need someone else’s help.

I don’t know the answer to that question, but I bet your doctor does. We can ask him at your next appointment.

Explore ways to help them understand their condition in a way that makes sense.

The reason you are itching is because you are kind of stuck in what people call a cycle. It’s like being on a merry-go-round that doesn’t stop.

If your child is struggling with their social situation, help them find a simple way to explain what eczema is and isn’t to their friends and classmates.

It’s a condition called eczema. It is dry, itchy skin, but it's not contagious. You can't catch it from me.

Be Prepared When You Visit Your Child’s Doctor

The first step to managing your child’s eczema is being prepared to talk to their doctor.

These tips can help for a productive discussion with your child’s doctor.

Before

Prepare a list of symptoms most bothersome to them (help younger children with the list).

Discuss the impact of symptoms on your child’s daily activities.

During

When in doubt, ask your questions.

Encourage your child to speak up. Don’t be shy.

Get a next-step plan from their doctor.

After

Implement the plan you, your child, and your doctor created.

Monitor your child’s progress by checking in with them regularly.

How to Talk to Your Teen About Eczema

Do the text conversations feel familiar? It can be hard to find the right time or way to talk to your teen about their eczema.

The topics below are good conversation starters and can help your teen understand an underlying cause of their moderate-to-severe eczema.

Conversation Starter Motivational Checking In
  • You may actually have atopic dermatitis—a chronic form of eczema.
  • The itching and the rashes you keep seeing and feeling are actually caused, in part, by inflammation underneath your skin.
  • Even though your skin looks clear, inflammation may still be present beneath the skin. Your flare-ups could reappear at any time.
  • There’s more understanding about eczema. Thanks to emerging science, there's a better understanding of the disease.
  • We want to help. Being detailed and honest with yourself about your symptoms can help you get the right treatment.

Be Prepared When You Visit Your Child’s Doctor

The first step to managing your child’s eczema is being prepared to talk to their doctor.

These tips can help for a productive discussion with your child’s doctor.

Before

Prepare a list of symptoms most bothersome to them (help younger children with the list).

Discuss the impact of symptoms on your child’s daily activities.

During

When in doubt, ask your questions.

Encourage your child to speak up. Don’t be shy.

Get a next-step plan from their doctor.

After

Implement the plan you, your child, and your doctor created.

Monitor your child’s progress by checking in with them regularly.

Start Managing Your Skin
Connect With a Specialist Who Treats Eczema
Use this tool to easily find a dermatologist or allergist near you who can treat atopic dermatitis.
Sanofi US and Regeneron do not endorse or recommend any particular physician, and search results do not include a comprehensive list of doctors in your area.
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Stay in the Know

While scientists are working hard to develop a deeper understanding of what’s going on underneath the skin, you and your child can get helpful resources, activities, and the latest news and developments.